Opinio Juris: “Foreign Intelligence” ≠ Foreigner Intelligence (Expatriate Americans in PRISM)

Apropos of my doing a summer internship abroad and wondering, as news of the PRISM scandal emerged, whether it also applies to Americans in other countries — Peter Spiro at Opinio Juris has written a post about just that issue!

Spiro writes:

If on the internet it’s difficult to draw the domestic/foreign line in territorial terms, it’s only more so in terms of citizenship. The surveillance is all secret, so there’s no chance to declare yourself an American. There’s really no way for the Government to know whether you are a citizen or not. There is no master list of US citizens. For every John Smith Bank of America employee temporarily in London (who might be easily flagged as a US citizen), there are many who have acquired citizenship in less obvious ways and who don’t wear their American identity on their electronic sleeve. Does the NSA have a citizenship algorithm?

His conclusion:

If you’re American, you have the same rights against governmental action in Paris as you do in Detroit. But even in the non-virtual world, it’s tough to know the citizenship status of people behind foreign doors you are about to knock down. There’s no evidence that anyone in the intelligence apparatus is even trying to stay true to the constitutional rule. Perhaps yet another reason for several million expatriate Americans to feel second class.

More at “Foreign Intelligence” ≠ Foreigner Intelligence (Expatriate Americans in PRISM).

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